How are quantitative and qualitative analysis similar, and how might they reasonably differ?

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Footnotes:

[1] Alan Bryman and Melissa Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis  (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2009).

[2] Ibid.

[3] Katrin Niglas, “Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry in Educational Research:  Is There A Paradigmatic Difference Between Them?,” in European Conference on Educational Research (Lahti, Finland: Tallinn Pedagogical University, 1999).

[4] Wendy Hollway, “The importance of relational thinking in the practice of psycho-social research: ontology, epistemology, methodology and ethics,” in Exploring Psyco-Social Studies (London: Karnac, 2008).

[5] Alan Bryman, Social Research Methods, 4th ed. (Oxford University Press, 2012).

[6] Abbas Tashakkori, SAGE Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social & Behavioral Research, 4th ed. (SAGE Publications, 2010). Mixed methods is however, beyond the scope of the discussion in this paper.

[7] Bryman, Social Research Methods.

[8] Corliss et al., “Sexual orientation and drug use in a longtudinal cohort study of U.S. adolescents,” Addictive Behaviours 35(2010).

[9] Vikki Charles and Tim Weaver, “A qualitative study of illicit and non-prescribed drug use amongst people with psychotic disorders,” Journal of Mental Health 19, no. 1 (2010).

[10] Justin Cruickshank, Realism and sociology: anti-foundationalism, ontology and social research, vol. Canada (Routledge, 2003).

[11] Bryman, Social Research Methods.

[12] “Quantitative and Qualitative Research,” Explorable: Think Outside the Box, https://explorable.com/quantitative-and-qualitative-research.

[13] Looi Theam Choy, “The Strengths and Weaknesses of Research Methodology: Comparison and Complimentary between Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches” IOSR Journal Of Humanities And Social Science 19, no. 4 (2014).

[14] Bryman, Social Research Methods.

[15] “Quantitative and Qualitative Research”.

[16] Choy, “The Strengths and Weaknesses of Research Methodology: Comparison and Complimentary between Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches”.

[17] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[18] Carol Lynne Fulton, “Plausibility,” in Encyclopedia of Case Study Research, ed. Albert Mills (SAGE Research Methods, 2010).

[19] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[20] Ibid.

[21] Ibid.

[22] Ibid.

[23] al., “Sexual orientation and drug use in a longtudinal cohort study of U.S. adolescents.”

[24] Ibid.

[25] Weaver, “A qualitative study of illicit and non-prescribed drug use amongst people with psychotic disorders.”

[26] Ibid.

[27] Thomas Schwandt, “Authority,” in The SAGE Dictionary of Qualitative Inquiry (SAGE Research Methods, 2007).

[28] John Brewer, “Meaning,” in The A-Z of Social Research, ed. Robert Miller (SAGE Research Methods, 2003).

[29] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Ibid.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Arjun Gupta, Theory of Sample Surveys, 4th ed. (World Scientific, 2011).

[34] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[35] Nick Emmel, Sampling and Choosing Cases in Qualitative Research: A Realist Approach, 4th ed. (SAGE, 2013).

[36] Ibid.

[37] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[38] Ibid.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Gupta, Theory of Sample Surveys.

[41] Bary Cooper et al., Challenging the Qualitative-Quantitative Divide: Explorations in Case-focused Causal Analysis  (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012).

[42] Angela Velez, “Evaluating Research Methods: Assumptions, Strengths, and Weaknesses of Three Educational Research Paradigms,” Davenport University, http://www.unco.edu/AE-Extra/2008/9/velez.html.

[43] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[44] Ibid.

[45] Ibid.

[46] Ibid.

[47] al., “Sexual orientation and drug use in a longtudinal cohort study of U.S. adolescents.”

[48] Weaver, “A qualitative study of illicit and non-prescribed drug use amongst people with psychotic disorders.”

[49] al., “Sexual orientation and drug use in a longtudinal cohort study of U.S. adolescents.”

[50] Weaver, “A qualitative study of illicit and non-prescribed drug use amongst people with psychotic disorders.”

[51] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[52] Ibid.

[53] Norma Romm, Accountability in Social Research  (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001).

[54] Egon Guba, “Authenticity Criteria,” in The SAGE Encyclopedia of Social Science Research Methods, ed. Michael Lewis (SAGE Research Methods, 2004).

[55] al., “Sexual orientation and drug use in a longtudinal cohort study of U.S. adolescents.”

[56] Weaver, “A qualitative study of illicit and non-prescribed drug use amongst people with psychotic disorders.”

[57] Bryman, Social Research Methods.

[58] Hardy, Handbook of Data Analysis.

[59] Jennifer Mason, “Working Paper: Six strategies for mixing methods and linking data in social science research ” in ESRC National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM Working Paper Series: University of Manchester 2006).

[60] David Morgan, “Practical Strategies for Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Applications to Health Research,” Qualitative Health Research 8, no. 3 (1998).

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